Tag: Bengal Famine

Assault on Winston Churchill, 2018: A Reader’s Guide

Assault on Winston Churchill, 2018: A Reader’s Guide

Assault and battery… Since I am los­ing track, I thought it would be con­ve­nient to cre­ate an index to the assault on Win­ston Churchill prompt­ed by Gary Oldman’s splen­did per­for­mance in the movie Dark­est Hour. The read­er will note the sim­i­lar­i­ty of top­ics. Many of these writ­ers feed off each oth­er, repeat­ing the same dis­proven argu­ments, with­out ever trou­bling indi­vid­u­al­ly to check their often-trun­cat­ed Churchill quotes or The Churchill Doc­u­ments which prove them irre­triev­ably, shock­ing­ly, wrong. The order is most recent first. I have missed any, please advise. . The noise is like­ly to go on for awhile.…

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Indians Again: No Oscars for Movies about War Criminals

Indians Again: No Oscars for Movies about War Criminals

If some peo­ple have any­thing to say, Gary Old­man and Dark­est Hour are inel­i­gi­ble for praise. “Oscars cel­e­brate Win­ston Churchill,” writes Tom Black­well in the Van­cou­ver Sun. “Some won­der if he was more war crim­i­nal than war hero for starv­ing Indi­ans.”

No doubt some peo­ple also won­der if it rains up.

Fair and Balanced?

Mr. Black­well makes a weak effort at bal­ance, quot­ing Arthur Her­man, emi­nent author of Gand­hi and Churchill. “Absent Churchill,” Her­man says, “Bengal’s Famine Would Have Been Worse.” He lists the true caus­es of the Ben­gal famine—which were many and varied—and Britain’s efforts to relieve the plight of Indi­ans.…

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“I don’t want [my views] disturbed by any bloody Indian”: Was it Churchill?

“I don’t want [my views] disturbed by any bloody Indian”: Was it Churchill?

“I am quite sat­is­fied with my views of India. I don’t want them dis­turbed by any bloody Indi­an.” Thus Win­ston Churchill said (or is alleged to have said) to Lord Hal­i­fax née Lord Irwin née Edward Wood, in 1929.

“Bludgeon of choice”

A his­to­ri­an friend says the Indi­an Ben­gal Famine (1943) “is on its way to sur­pass­ing the Dar­d­anelles (1915) as the blud­geon of choice for Churchill’s detrac­tors.” He was com­ment­ing on the lat­est out­burst of Ben­gal Famine nonsense—contested by a thought­ful Indi­an, as well as myself: scroll to com­ments.

“Bloody Indi­an” tracks to Ben Pim­lott, edi­tor, The Sec­ond World War Diary of Hugh Dal­ton 1940-45 (Jonathan Cape 1986), 126.…

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