Month: October 2010

Provide for Your Library

Provide for Your Library

“BILL’S BOOKS”

“What shall I do with all my books?” Churchill asked in Thoughts and Adven­tures. It is a ques­tion we should all ponder—while there is still time.

In the Novem­ber 1st issue of Nation­al Review, Neal B. Free­man writes a touch­ing and sen­si­tive appre­ci­a­tion of the library of the late William F. Buck­ley, Jr.: an eclec­tic mix, from tomes on the harp­si­chord to biogra­phies of Elvis Pres­ley, from books inscribed to him to fever­ish­ly marked-up books relat­ing to Buckley’s own writ­ing, to the clas­sics he admired. Because he had not thought to leave spe­cif­ic instruc­tions, his library was bro­ken up, scat­tered to the winds—and not every­thing in it reached an appre­cia­tive owner.…

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Churchill’s Rare Press Conferences

Churchill’s Rare Press Conferences

I am  com­plet­ing an Eng­lish assign­ment which looks at the speech­es of Win­ston Churchill and would like to look at any radio inter­views Churchill gave dur­ing World War II but have, so far, only been able to find speech­es. Please could you advise me whether any such inter­views are in exis­tence? —E.L.

Churchill rarely gave interviews—only two that I know of as a young man, and those reluc­tant­ly. Speech­es (live) were his pref­er­ence. How­ev­er, on his vis­it to Wash­ing­ton after Pearl Har­bor, on 23 Decem­ber 1941, Pres­i­den­tial Roo­sevelt ush­ered him into a pres­i­den­tial press con­fer­ence, where he acquit­ted him­self well.…

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Translations of “The Second World War”

Translations of “The Second World War”

I‘m work­ing on an arti­cle and there are some details I need to know: (1) The num­ber of lan­guages into which Churchill’s Sec­ond World War mem­oirs were trans­lat­ed and (2) The num­ber of lan­guages into which the 1959 abridged one-vol­ume edi­tion was trans­lat­ed. —G.A., Spain

Accord­ing to Ronald I. Cohen’s Bib­li­og­ra­phy of the Writ­ings of Sir Win­ston Churchill (Lon­don: Con­tin­u­um, 2006, 3 vols., I: 729-30), The Sec­ond World War was trans­lat­ed into nine­teen lan­guages: Czech, Croa­t­ian, Dan­ish, Dutch, French, Ger­man, Greek, Hebrew, Ital­ian, Japan­ese, Kore­an, Nor­we­gian, Pol­ish, Por­tuguese, Russ­ian, Ser­bian, Span­ish, Swedish and Turkish.…

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