Month: September 2010

World War II Official Histories

World War II Official Histories

Does Eng­land have an offi­cial His­to­ry of WW2 like the “Green Books” that are print­ed in the US as their offi­cial his­to­ry of WW2 and where might find them?  —L.L.

Yes: sev­er­al spe­cial­ized mul­ti-vol­ume series, under the umbrel­la title His­to­ry of the Sec­ond World War, were pub­lished by HMSO (Her Majesty’s Sta­tionery Office, since 2006 part of the Office of Pub­lic Sec­tor Infor­ma­tion with­in the UK Nation­al Archives, for­mer­ly the Pub­lic Records Office).

There are five sub-series, for exam­ple, Llewellyn Wood­ward, British For­eign Pol­i­cy in the Sec­ond World War (five vols., 1970).…

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Robert Hardy at 85: The Greatest “Churchill”

Robert Hardy at 85: The Greatest “Churchill”

Address­ing the Churchill Soci­ety at the Reform Club, Lon­don, 1986.

Writ­ten for a birth­day trib­ute in Octo­ber 2010….

We have all heard about the art of Tim­o­thy Robert Hardy, even though we don’t need to do so, since it is self-evi­dent. But that real­ly doesn’t mat­ter, does it? His three-decade involve­ment with the Churchill saga pro­vides a bal­sam­ic reit­er­a­tion of what we know, are glad that we know, pity those who do not know, and are proud to be asso­ci­at­ed with.

It began with his peer­less por­tray­als of Sir Win­ston in the 1981 “Wilder­ness Years” TV doc­u­men­tary; David Susskind’s 1986 “Lead­ers” series; a Lon­don stage play; the mini-series “War and Remem­brance”; and—just this August 20th—a bril­liant read­ing from Churchill’s trib­ute to “The Few” on its 70th annniver­sary.…

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Battle of Britain 70th Anniversary 2010

Battle of Britain 70th Anniversary 2010

LONDON, AUGUST 20TH— Sev­en decades to the day after Win­ston Churchill’s inspir­ing salute to the Roy­al Air Force as the Bat­tle of Britain was reach­ing its height, Tim­o­thy Robert Hardy, the great­est actor ever to por­tray Churchill, deliv­ered por­tions of the Prime Minister’s House of Com­mons speech con­tain­ing the famous trib­ute: “Nev­er in the field of human con­flict was so much owed by so many to so few.”

The orig­i­nal speech was a long overview of the war sit­u­a­tion cov­er­ing many events beside “the great air bat­tle” rag­ing in the skies over Britain.…

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