“Buckley said, ‘it is the roar we hear when we hear his words.’ Past doubt. CHURCHILL DID NOT WIN THE WAR. His greatest achievement was that for eighteen months, when Britain and the Commonwealth stood alone, he didn’t lose it.” —RML
Nashville (1). Winston Churchill: Current Contentions and Things That Go Bump in the Night

Nashville (1). Winston Churchill: Current Contentions and Things That Go Bump in the Night

NASHVILLE, OCTOBER 14TH— The Churchill Soci­ety of Ten­nessee kind­ly invit­ed me to talk about Win­ston Churchill: Myth and Real­i­ty and the Hills­dale Col­lege Churchill Project. Our hosts, John and Karen Math­er and Dick and Lin­da Knight, could not have been more thought­ful, kinder and more gen­er­ous to Bar­bara and me. If I per­formed any­thing for them or Mr. Churchill,  that’s only a poor con­tri­bu­tion in an attempt at requital. *** As a bonus, I was hon­ored by a por­trait by Shane Neal​, a bril­liant Nashville artist and a gent​, as their way of say­ing thanks. In dis­cussing Churchill’s art, Shane was joined by fel­low artist Joseph Dai­ly, ​who paint­ed some forty por­traits of the Churchill fam­i­ly and their friends in Eng­land.  Over 100 turned up at the Brent­wood Coun­try Club​, in black tie or kilt, mine includ­ed.…

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“Incandescent Brilliance:” Churchill and Hilaire Belloc

“Incandescent Brilliance:” Churchill and Hilaire Belloc

“To Bel­loc this gen­er­a­tion owes big glimpses of the Home­r­ic spir­it. His mis­sion was to flay alive the hum­bugs and hyp­ocrites and the pedants and to chant robust folk-songs to a rous­ing oblig­a­to of clink­ing flagons….” He lat­er con­clud­ed that Lib­er­al reforms mere­ly offered the “prop­erty­less work­er per­pet­u­al security…in exchange for the sur­ren­der of polit­i­cal free­dom.” 

Excerpt­ed and con­densed from “Great Con­tem­po­raries: Hilaire Bel­loc,” for the Hills­dale Col­lege Churchill Project. For the full arti­cle click here.

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Joseph Hilaire Pierre Belloc

(1870-1953)—writer, sailor, poet, friend of Churchill—helped fuel Churchill’s pas­sion for the sur­vival of free gov­ern­ment. Anti-sta­tist, anti-col­lec­tivist and anti-estab­lish­ment, he deplored the servi­tude of the indus­tri­al wage-earn­er and longed to rec­on­cile his two great loves, “the soil of Eng­land and the Catholic faith.”

Born in France but edu­cat­ed at Birm­ing­ham and Oxford, he served with the French Artillery before becom­ing a nat­u­ral­ized British sub­ject in 1902.…

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John Peck, 1945: General Eisenhower asks if the war is over….

John Peck, 1945: General Eisenhower asks if the war is over….

Col. Gault (Mil­i­tary Assis­tant to Gen­er­al Eisen­how­er, 29 April 1945): “John Peck, is that you? The Gen­er­al told me to ask you if the war is over.”

Peck: “I beg your par­don?”

Gault: “Seri­ous­ly, we’ve got a press mes­sage here which says quite clear­ly that it’s all over. If so, nobody has told the Gen­er­al and he thought you would be the most like­ly to know at your end.”

Peck: “Well, if it has end­ed, nobody has told the Prime Min­is­ter either.”

Gault: “Do you think we had bet­ter car­ry on?”

Peck: “Yes, I think so.” [John then went back to sleep, and the war went on.]

Joys of The Churchill Documents

It is a priv­i­lege to help edit and proof Hills­dale Col­lege‘s final doc­u­ment vol­umes in the Churchill offi­cial biog­ra­phy.…

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