Tag: Holocaust

The Language: Some Issues over “Issues”

The Language: Some Issues over “Issues”

 Trashing tradition

“Issues over Issues” is reprint­ed with revi­sions from an essay in 2007.

“I con­fess myself to be a great admir­er of tra­di­tion. The longer you can look back, the far­ther you can look forward….The wider the span, the longer the con­ti­nu­ity, the greater is the sense of duty in indi­vid­ual men and women, each con­tribut­ing their brief life’s work to the preser­va­tion and progress of the land in which they live, the soci­ety of which they are mem­bers, and the world of which they are the ser­vants.” —Win­ston S. Churchill, Roy­al Col­lege of Physi­cians, 2 March 1944

“The Car­di­nals’ bus from their hotel in mid­town Man­hat­tan was delayed by more than an hour as it made its way to the ball­park on Wednes­day.…

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Churchill: Myth and Reality

Churchill: Myth and Reality

Per the pre­vi­ous post, I append for read­er com­ment the con­tents of my next book, Win­ston Churchill, Myth and Real­i­ty: What Churchill Stood For.

I have writ­ten on most of these mat­ters in the past; the book recasts it afresh. I also acknowl­edge and cross-ref­er­ence the work of experts who know far more than I, par­tic­u­lar­ly in the fields of geneal­o­gy and med­i­cine. I would be glad to hear your thoughts; please use the “con­tact” page.

The his­to­ri­an David Stafford wrote: “Myth only devel­ops and takes hold when the time is right, and the cli­mate has long been ripe for the emer­gence of myths about a wartime hero who stood firm against a total­i­tar­i­an foe and smote an evil empire.”

Churchill myth is born both of exag­ger­a­tion and crit­i­cism, cre­at­ed either to glo­ri­fy the record or to bela­bor it.…

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El-Sisi: The Churchill Test

El-Sisi: The Churchill Test

No Man of God, but Maybe Our Man…

On Christ­mas eve 1944, Prime Min­is­ter Win­ston Churchill left fam­i­ly cel­e­bra­tions and flew to Athens to medi­ate the Greek civ­il war. Com­mu­nists and roy­al­ists were fight­ing it out, but, armed with one promise Josef Stal­in actu­al­ly kept, Churchill thought he could give Greece a chance at democ­ra­cy.

(Stalin’s kept promise was the round­ly-con­demned “per­cent­ages agree­ment” in Moscow a few weeks ear­li­er, which gave Britain a sphere of influ­ence in Greece in exchange for Sovi­et spheres in pret­ty much the rest of East­ern Europe.)

Churchill had nev­er heard of Arch­bish­op Damask­i­nos, the man his For­eign Office said might rec­on­cile the fac­tions and head off a Com­mu­nist takeover.…

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