Category: In the News

Sir Winston’s Enduring Legacy: Churchill Day 2019

Sir Winston’s Enduring Legacy: Churchill Day 2019

Washington, 1963

Jacque­line Kennedy offered a touch­ing and durable vision of Churchill’s lega­cy at the White House cer­e­mo­ny on 9 April 1963—now “Churchill Day” in Amer­i­ca. It was when Pres­i­dent Kennedy bestowed hon­orary U.S. cit­i­zen­ship on Sir Win­ston.

Aged 88, Churchill was rep­re­sent­ed by his son Ran­dolph, who was a bun­dle of nerves. In the Oval Office before­hand, the First Lady recalled, “Ran­dolph was ashen, his voice a whis­per. ‘All that this cer­e­mo­ny means to [Ran­dolph and the Pres­i­dent],’ I thought, ‘is the gift they wish it to be for Randolph’s father.’” “Ran­dolph stepped for­ward to respond: ‘Mr.…

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Churchill, Tonypandy and “Poundland Lenin”

Churchill, Tonypandy and “Poundland Lenin”

Tony­pandy, Wales is in the news again with fuzzy pur­vey­ors of his­to­ry. On 13 Feb­ru­ary the Guardian head­lined, “Win­ston Churchill was a vil­lain, says John McDon­nell.” (Mr. Don­nell is Labour’s shad­ow Chan­cel­lor of the Exche­quer in the House of Com­mons.)

“Villain — Tonypandy”

Mr. McDonnell’s swipe at Churchill was brief. Asked if he saw Churchill as a hero or vil­lain, he replied: “Villain—Tonypandy.” The Guardian com­plet­ed the dri­ve-by assas­si­na­tion, not only by head­lin­ing the remark, but with an inac­cu­rate rehash of the Tony­pandy riots in 1910.

Sir Winston’s grand­son, Sir Nicholas Soames, focused on McDon­nell, call­ing him a “Pound­land Lenin.” Maybe, but what about the Guardian? Iron­i­cal­ly, at the time, the same news­pa­per had defend­ed Churchill for his mod­er­a­tion.…

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Bengal Famine: The Hottest of Churchill Debates

Bengal Famine: The Hottest of Churchill Debates

Bengal 1943-44

Most pop­u­lar by far: On both the Hills­dale Col­lege Churchill Project web­site and this one, more read­er com­ment is engen­dered over Churchill’s role in the 1943 Ben­gal Famine than any oth­er sub­ject. A lot of it, pro and con, is by Indi­ans them­selves. This is under­stand­able. The food short­age that rav­aged Ben­gal in 1943-44 was the great­est human­i­tar­i­an cri­sis in India’s his­to­ry. Up to three mil­lion peo­ple died—5% of the province’s pop­u­la­tion. Pro­por­tion­al­ly, think 16 mil­lion Amer­i­cans.

The book that start­ed the con­tro­ver­sy, Churchill’s Secret War, is now eight years old.…

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