Tag: Harry Jaffa

Churchill’s “Visual Philosophy”: All the Curtis Hooper Prints

Churchill’s “Visual Philosophy”: All the Curtis Hooper Prints

Exhibited at Hillsdale College

In the 1970s, Sarah Churchill was involved in the com­mer­cial pub­li­ca­tion of a series of twen­ty-eight intaglio draw­ings by Cur­tis Hoop­er enti­tled, “A Visu­al Phi­los­o­phy of Sir Win­ston Churchill.”  The draw­ings were based upon famous Churchill pho­tographs and Sarah sup­plied suit­able quo­ta­tions for each.

Decades have passed since Sir Winston’s death, but Cur­tis Hooper’s dra­mat­ic graphite draw­ings are as life­like as ever. “While many only know Churchill for his wartime lead­er­ship, the ‘Visu­al Phi­los­o­phy’ series is unique in that it con­tains vignettes drawn from through­out his entire life,” said Churchill Fel­low and Hills­dale senior Ross Hat­ley.…

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Announcing “Winston Churchill, Myth and Reality”

Announcing “Winston Churchill, Myth and Reality”

Win­ston Churchill, Myth and Real­i­ty: What He Actu­al­ly Did and Said is now avail­able in paper­back and Kin­dle for­mats from Ama­zon.  Excerpts from my remarks the Hills­dale Col­lege Churchill Con­fer­ence, 20 Feb­ru­ary 2017. Videos are online for all pre­sen­ta­tions.

Myth and Reality

Not a day pass­es when Win­ston Churchill, who proved indis­pens­able when lib­er­ty hung in the bal­ance, is not accused of some­thing dread­ful. Charges range from alco­holism and racism to misog­y­ny and war­mon­ger­ing. Fre­quent­ly there is no doc­u­men­ta­tion, only par­tial quotes select­ed to advance pre­con­ceived notions and canards. Win­ston Churchill: Myth and Real­i­ty, con­fronts this busy indus­try.…

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Churchill on Socialism

Churchill on Socialism

“The Recruit­ing Parade,” David Low in The Star, 7 Octo­ber 1924. Fig­ures are labeled “Plot Press,” “Monop­o­list,” “Defeats” (Churchill), “Hard­face Employ­er,” “Cracked Pro­tec­tion,” “Ideals are Tom­my Rot” and “Plot Press” (Lord Beaver­brook), Churchill was mak­ing his third bid to regain a seat in Par­lia­ment, which he won. He was “so tick­led” by Low’s car­toon that he offered to pur­chase it, and the Labour news­pa­per sent it to him as a gift. He ran it with his essay “Car­toons and Car­toon­ists,” in Thoughts and Adven­tures (1932).

This quo­ta­tion is now going around the web, broad­ly attrib­uted to Churchill.…

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