Tag: Atomic Bomb

Bombing Japan: Churchill’s View

Bombing Japan: Churchill’s View

Intaglio print by Sarah Churchill/Curtis Hoop­er (http://bit.ly/1uYE2PD)

Scott John­son of Pow­er­line (“Why We Dropped the Bomb,” 13 April) kind­ly links an old col­umn of his quot­ing an old one of mine with ref­er­ence to Pres­i­dent Obama’s vis­it to Hiroshi­ma and the atom bomb­ing of Japan.

John­son links a lec­ture by Pro­fes­sor Williamson Mur­ray, which is worth con­sid­er­ing, along with Paul Fussell’s clas­sic essay in The New Repub­lic, “Thank God for the Atom Bomb,” which makes you think, though some con­sid­er it a rant. Fussell wrote:

John Ken­neth Gal­braith is per­suad­ed that the Japan­ese would have sur­ren­dered sure­ly by Novem­ber with­out an inva­sion.…

Read More Read More

Shocking Facts: “Nuke the Soviets”

Shocking Facts: “Nuke the Soviets”

Intaglio print by Sarah Churchill/Curtis Hoop­er
http://bit.ly/1uYE2PD

Novem­ber 5th— A call from the Lon­don Dai­ly Mail: “We are doing a piece on a new book and want­ed to run it by you.”

Novem­ber 6th— The new book is Thomas Maier’s When Lions Roar: The Churchills and the Kennedys. What’s excit­ing is their dis­cov­ery of a Shock­ing Fact about Churchill (Shock­ing Fact #22,385, by my count.)

Mr. Maier reports, calm­ly and dis­pas­sion­ate­ly, a 1947 con­ver­sa­tion between Churchill and Sen­a­tor Stiles Bridges (R-NH). In it, Churchill says “that if an atom­ic bomb could be dropped on the Krem­lin wip­ing it out, it would be a very easy prob­lem to han­dle the bal­ance of Rus­sia, which would be with­out direc­tion.”

So—wow—the Mail is real­ly onto an exposé.…

Read More Read More

“Marketing a War”: Ken Rendell’s WW2 Museum

“Marketing a War”: Ken Rendell’s WW2 Museum

World War II: Sav­ing the Real­i­ty, A Collector’s Vault, by Ken­neth W. Ren­dell. Whit­man Pub­lish­ing, hard­bound, slip-cased, 144 pages, pro­fuse­ly illus­trat­ed in col­or with 80 repli­cas, $49.95, $32.97 from Ama­zon.

Here is the most indis­pens­able guide ever cre­at­ed to the war that made us what we are today. From teenagers to vet­er­ans, read­ers will be enthralled with this portable ver­sion of Ken Rendell’s Muse­um of World War II: that inim­itable col­lec­tion of wartime mem­o­ra­bil­ia, doc­u­ments, per­son­al effects and auto­graphs housed in an unla­beled build­ing in sub­ur­ban Boston.

Vis­its to the Muse­um itself are nec­es­sar­i­ly restrict­ed.…

Read More Read More