Tag: Robert Sherwood

Churchill’s Washington Humor, Part 1

Churchill’s Washington Humor, Part 1

Church­ll address­es Con­gress, 26 Decem­ber 1941

A friend who is deliv­er­ing a Churchill speech in D.C. asked for some exam­ples of Churchil­ian humor involv­ing Wash­ing­ton and U.S. Pres­i­dents.

Every­one enjoys Churchill’s famous crack in his first (1941) speech to Con­gress:

“If my father had been Amer­i­can, and my moth­er British, instead of the oth­er way round, I might have got here on my own!” That brought down the house.

When in the U.S., Churchill liked to empha­size his Amer­i­can roots. Broad­cast­ing to Amer­i­ca six months ear­li­er, he avowed some­thing he always believed:

 The great Burke has tru­ly said, “Peo­ple will not look for­ward to pos­ter­i­ty who nev­er look back­ward to their ances­tors,” and I feel it most agree­able to recall to you that the Jeromes were root­ed for many gen­er­a­tions in Amer­i­can soil, and fought in Washington’s armies for the inde­pen­dence of the Amer­i­can Colonies and the foun­da­tion of the Unit­ed States.…

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“Nothing to Hide”: The Truth about Churchill’s Naked Encounter

“Nothing to Hide”: The Truth about Churchill’s Naked Encounter

Stark Naked

Churchill (step­ping naked from his bath): “The Prime Min­is­ter of Great Britain has noth­ing to hide from the Pres­i­dent of the Unit­ed States.” **

[Also quot­ed as: “You see, Mr. Pres­i­dent, I have noth­ing to hide.”]

Churchill alleged­ly said this dur­ing his vis­it to the White House in Decem­ber-Jan­u­ary 1941.  The Japan­ese had attacked Pearl Har­bor and Amer­i­ca was in the war.  The encounter was con­firmed by Churchill’s body­guard, Wal­ter Thomp­son, and one of his sec­re­taries, Patrick Kin­na. On the strength of their com­ments I includ­ed it as “like­ly” in Churchill By Him­self.

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Atlantic Conference, Newfoundland, August 1941

Atlantic Conference, Newfoundland, August 1941

"O God Our Help in Ages Past": Argen­tia, 12 August 1941. Stand­ing behind Roo­sevelt and Churchill: Admi­ral Ernest J. King (USN); Gen­er­al George C. Mar­shall (U.S. Army); Field Mar­shal Sir John Dill (British Army); Admi­ral Harold R. Stark (USN); Admi­ral of the Fleet Sir Dud­ley Pound (RN). At far left is Har­ry Hop­kins, talk­ing with W. Averell Har­ri­man. (Wiki­me­dia Com­mons)

I am research­ing the events sur­round­ing, and indi­vid­u­als active­ly involved in, the first war-time Anglo-Amer­i­can sum­mit, the “Atlantic Con­fer­ence,” which took place in at Argen­tia, New­found­land from 9 through 12 August 1941.…

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