Tag: Neville Chamberlain

Munich Reflections: Peace for “a” Time & the Case for Resistance

Munich Reflections: Peace for “a” Time & the Case for Resistance

Jour­nal­ist Leo McKinstry’s Churchill and Attlee is a deft analy­sis of a polit­i­cal odd cou­ple who led Britain’s Sec­ond World War coali­tion gov­ern­ment. Now, eighty years since the death of Neville Cham­ber­lain, he has pub­lished an excel­lent appraisal in The Spec­ta­tor. Churchill’s pre­de­ces­sor as Prime Min­is­ter, Cham­ber­lain nego­ti­at­ed the 1938 Munich agree­ment. “Peace for our time,” he famous­ly referred to it.  In the end, he bought the world peace for a time.

Mr. McK­instry is right to regret that Cham­ber­lain has been rough­ly han­dled by his­to­ry. “The real­i­ty is that in the late 1930s Chamberlain’s approach was a ratio­nal one,” he writes.…

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Winston Churchill on the “Unconquerable Welsh” and David Lloyd George

Winston Churchill on the “Unconquerable Welsh” and David Lloyd George

An appo­site quo­ta­tion at this moment, with Wales locked down in the face of Covid…

Ques­tion: I have unsuc­cess­ful­ly searched the web for a speech Win­ston Churchill gave to Par­lia­ment refer­ring to the Welsh as “the unde­feat­able race.” Do you know the speech? I believe it was in Churchill’s address fol­low­ing the death of David Lloyd George in March 1945. —S.D.

“Unconquerable Welsh”

It did occur in that speech, but Churchill’s word was “uncon­quer­able,” not “unde­feat­able.”

In his Lloyd George trib­ute, Churchill spoke of the Welsh as “that uncon­quer­able race.” I have emailed you the full text of “The Death of Earl Lloyd George,” in 1945.…

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80 Years On: Winston Churchill Prime Minister, 10 May 1940

80 Years On: Winston Churchill Prime Minister, 10 May 1940

The 10th of May…

In the splin­ter­ing crash of this vast bat­tle the qui­et con­ver­sa­tions we had had in Down­ing Street fad­ed or fell back in one’s mind. How­ev­er, I remem­ber being told that Mr. Cham­ber­lain had gone, or was going, to see the King, and this was nat­u­ral­ly to be expect­ed. Present­ly a mes­sage arrived sum­mon­ing me to the Palace at six o’clock. It only takes two min­utes to dri­ve there from the Admi­ral­ty along the Mall. Although I sup­pose the evening news­pa­pers must have been full of the ter­rif­ic news from the Con­ti­nent, noth­ing had been men­tioned about the Cab­i­net cri­sis.…

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