Tag: Hillsdale Churchill Project

Cars & Churchill: Blood, Sweat & Gears (2) Daimlers…

Cars & Churchill: Blood, Sweat & Gears (2) Daimlers…

Hav­ing writ­ten about cars and Win­ston Churchill for fifty years, I final­ly pro­duced a piece on them both. From exot­i­ca like Daim­ler, Napi­er and Rolls-Royce to more pro­sa­ic makes like Austin, Hum­ber and Wolse­ley, the sto­ry was three decades in com­ing. I am sat­is­fied that it is now com­plete.

Part 2, con­tin­ued from Part 1: Excerpt only. For foot­notes,  all illus­tra­tions and a ros­ter of Churchill’s cars, see The Auto­mo­bile, August 2016. 

Wolseley to Austin

In the ear­ly 1930s Churchill switched from Wolse­ley to Austin cars: small fours and big six­es. One of the for­mer, a 1938 Austin 10 Cam­bridge, was the Chartwell work­horse.…

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Churchill and the Bengal Famine

Churchill and the Bengal Famine

Leopold S. Amery, Sec­re­tary of State for India and Bur­ma 1940-45. (Wiki­me­dia Com­mons)

A wide­ly pub­li­cized 2010 book alleged that Churchill refused to help India dur­ing the 1943-44 famine in Ben­gal. The charges were explod­ed years ago, but the accu­sa­tion con­tin­ues to sur­face. Churchill’s sup­posed dark secrets and fatal flaws are pop­u­lar among those who refuse to read the full details on the mat­ter.

In 2010 the late Sir Mar­tin Gilbert, Churchill’s offi­cial biog­ra­ph­er, told me he had looked care­ful­ly into con­tem­po­rary 1943-44 doc­u­ments. He said they entire­ly exon­er­ate Churchill and the War Cab­i­net. He would pub­lish this mate­r­i­al in the appro­pri­ate vol­ume of the offi­cial biog­ra­phy, Win­ston S.

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“Never Surrender,” by John Kelly

“Never Surrender,” by John Kelly

Nev­er Sur­ren­der: Win­ston Churchill and Britain’s Deci­sion to Fight Nazi Ger­many in the Fate­ful Sum­mer of 1940, by John Kel­ly. Scrib­n­er, 2015, 370 pp., $19.88, Kin­dle $14.99.

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May 1940: Lord Hal­i­fax “sound­ed like a ner­vous solic­i­tor read­ing from a half-thought-out brief….When Churchill spoke of fight­ing on alone, the man­tle of his­to­ry—Agin­court, Water­loo, Trafal­gar, the Arma­da—sang through his sen­tences.”

Here is a well-writ­ten and orga­nized review of main­ly well-known events, retold with dra­mat­ic prose and crisp analy­sis. It’s an ide­al book for young peo­ple unfa­mil­iar with the scope of Churchill’s achieve­ment in 1940, and, indeed, for any­one who wants a good account of the events that saved West­ern civ­i­liza­tion.…

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