Tag: World War II

Nashville (4). Churchill as Warmonger in World War I

Nashville (4). Churchill as Warmonger in World War I

“Winston…has got on all his war-paint” (Asquith)

In 1914, the Great War arrives, and fables about Churchill mul­ti­ply. A pop­u­lar one, kept alive by pun­dits and his­to­ri­ans, alike, is that Churchill led the war­mon­ger par­ty into World War I. Remarks to the Churchill Soci­ety of Ten­nessee, Nashville, 14 Octo­ber 2017. Con­tin­ued from Part 3...

Patrick J. Buchanan is an affa­ble tory who wrote speech­es for Nixon and ran quixot­ic cam­paigns for Pres­i­dent of the U.S. three times in 1992-2000. (I vot­ed for him once!) He’s an effec­tive con­trar­i­an, and his debat­ing skills are renowned.…

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Praise for “Avoidable War”

Praise for “Avoidable War”

Churchill and the Avoid­able War will cost you the price of a cup of cof­fee. You can read it in a cou­ple of nights.  You may then  decide if Churchill was right (or wrong) that World War II could have been pre­vent­ed. Click on “Buy Now” under the book image at right on this page.

Here is an excel­lent sur­vey of the key “what if” junc­tures where his­to­ry could have tak­en a dif­fer­ent turn. What I like about it espe­cial­ly is that it con­sci­en­tious­ly steers away from any defin­i­tive pro­nounce­ments about one zig or zag mak­ing all the dif­fer­ence in pre­vent­ing World War II.…

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“Marketing a War”: Ken Rendell’s WW2 Museum

“Marketing a War”: Ken Rendell’s WW2 Museum

World War II: Sav­ing the Real­i­ty, A Collector’s Vault, by Ken­neth W. Ren­dell. Whit­man Pub­lish­ing, hard­bound, slip-cased, 144 pages, pro­fuse­ly illus­trat­ed in col­or with 80 repli­cas, $49.95, $32.97 from Ama­zon.

Here is the most indis­pens­able guide ever cre­at­ed to the war that made us what we are today. From teenagers to vet­er­ans, read­ers will be enthralled with this portable ver­sion of Ken Rendell’s Muse­um of World War II: that inim­itable col­lec­tion of wartime mem­o­ra­bil­ia, doc­u­ments, per­son­al effects and auto­graphs housed in an unla­beled build­ing in sub­ur­ban Boston.

Vis­its to the Muse­um itself are nec­es­sar­i­ly restrict­ed.…

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