Tag: Lincoln

Churchillian (or Yogi Berra) Drift: How Quotations are Invented

Churchillian (or Yogi Berra) Drift: How Quotations are Invented

Above: Drift into Trinidad, March 1961. Churchill, 87, at the Governor’s res­i­dence, Port of Spain, dur­ing a cruise aboard the Onas­sis yacht Christi­na. A sim­i­lar (unsigned) pho­to was sold at auc­tion in 2010. Low­er right: Dr. Eric Williams, who in August 1962 became the first prime min­is­ter of inde­pen­dent Trinidad and Toba­go. I would wel­come iden­ti­ties for the oth­ers in the pho­to.

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Churchillian Drift is just the tick­et. I have been look­ing for a term to describe the numer­ous pot­ted, inac­cu­rate Churchill quotes. “A lie gets halfway around the world before the truth puts its trousers on.” That is big right now on Twit­ter.…

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Bill Buckley, Churchillian

Bill Buckley, Churchillian

William F. Buck­ley, Jr. recall­ing her father’s speech­es with Lady Soames, Boston, 1995.

In Right Time, Right Place, his new book about his life work­ing with Wil­i­iam F. Buck­ley, Jr. at Nation­al Review, Richard Brookhis­er aserts that WFB dis­liked Sir Win­ston. I queried Brookhis­er who replied: “WFB’s obit for Churchill in NR was notably grudg­ing, and reflect­ed I think his youth­ful Amer­i­ca First con­vic­tions.” As these two men are my only heroes, I was dis­ap­point­ed to see such an asser­tion from some­one who appar­ent­ly knew Buck­ley very well. Based on host­ing him at the 1995 Inter­na­tion­al Churchill Con­fer­ence, do you think this is true? —C.C.…

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Jack French Kemp 1935-2009

Jack French Kemp 1935-2009

 

Jack Kemp, a 1993 pho­to inscribed to Har­ri­et and Michael Lang­worth

“DASH OF GREYHOUND, SLIPPING THONGS…”

On Eleuthera, where we live from Decem­ber to April, there was vast fas­ci­na­tion, as one might expect, in the recent U.S. Pres­i­den­tial elec­tion. One of the virtues of this Bahamas island far out in the Atlantic is that racism, in the sense we all know it in the so-called First World, doesn’t real­ly exist. On our easy-going trop­i­cal strand, amid the smiles of wel­com­ing locals and old friends who have known each oth­er for years, it just doesn’t seem to mat­ter whether the face in front of you is black or white.…

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