Tag: Harvard

Churchill-Syria Analogies: A “Syrious” Situation

Churchill-Syria Analogies: A “Syrious” Situation

Inter­est­ing Churchill-Syr­ia hits on Google Alerts for Sep­tem­ber 8th:

 Will Durst, in “Pied Piper of the Potomac” (Sum­mit Dai­ly):

Every­one pre­tends not to be knee-deep in the icky, tricky, sticky Syr­ia sit­u­a­tion. You might say Wash­ing­ton is in a Semi-Syri­ous mode right now. And a Semi-Not-So-Syri­ous mode. Simul­ta­ne­ous­ly. Because this whole affair is rid­dled with enig­mas and mys­ter­ies enough to make Win­ston Churchill spin his conun­drums right off. And rumor has it, he har­bored huge conun­drums.

He has that right. I don’t know if Will Durst is a Churchillian, but he cer­tain­ly has Churchill’s knack for coin­ing words.…

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Churchill’s Washington Humor, Part 2

Churchill’s Washington Humor, Part 2

After his Har­vard address on Anglo-Amer­i­can uni­ty, 1943. At left is his ubiq­ui­tous body­guard, Detec­tive Inspec­tor Wal­ter Thomp­son.

Con­tin­ued from Part 1…

Win­ston Churchill was the only for­eign­er to have made three speech­es to joint ses­sions of Con­gress. His last was in 1952—whose text I was asked for by Nel­son Mandela’s rep­re­sen­ta­tives when Man­dela, a Churchill admir­er, him­self addressed a joint ses­sion. In his 1952 speech Churchill famous­ly told Con­gress:

I am hon­oured indeed by these expe­ri­ences which I believe are unique for one who is not an Amer­i­can cit­i­zen. It is also of great val­ue to me, on again becom­ing the head of His Majesty’s Gov­ern­ment, to come over here and take coun­sel with many trust­ed friends and com­rades of for­mer anx­ious days.…

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Churchill’s Speech Problem: A Lisp, not a Stutter

Churchill’s Speech Problem: A Lisp, not a Stutter

What many thought was stut­ter­ing was a prop, not a hand­i­cap.

Churchill’s speech prob­lem was a lisp. He could not pro­nounce the let­ter “S” and nev­er real­ly learned to do so—so he turned it into a prop, exag­ger­at­ing words like his famous “Narz­zsseess” for “Nazis.”

What some peo­ple thought was stut­ter­ing was his habit of turn­ing over a word or phrase in an under­tone before set­tling on the final words. He often used this tech­nique in speech­es, because he found that it would stir peo­ple to renewed inter­est in what he was about to say next.…

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