Tag: Arthur Herman

“Amnesia” or Fantasy? The Indian Contribution in World War II

“Amnesia” or Fantasy? The Indian Contribution in World War II

Indi­an amne­sia? “Dunkirk, the War, and the Amne­sia of the Empire,” by Yas­min Khan. New York Times Opin­ion page, 2 August 2017.

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We should be grate­ful to Pro­fes­sor Yas­min Khan. Why? Because in deplor­ing the absence of Indi­an troops in the new movie Dunkirk, and the trag­ic 1943 Ben­gal famine, she blames “the impe­r­i­al state,” not the usu­al cul­prit, Win­ston Churchill:

At least three mil­lion Ben­galis died in a cat­a­stroph­ic famine in 1943, a famine that is almost nev­er dis­cussed. The famine’s caus­es were a byprod­uct of the war, but as Mad­hus­ree Muk­er­jee has proved in her book Churchill’s Secret War, the impe­r­i­al state also failed to deliv­er relief.…

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“Rascals, etc….”: Churchill & India

“Rascals, etc….”: Churchill & India

“Rascals, Rogues and Freebooters”

“Pow­er will go to the hands of ras­cals, rogues, free­boot­ers; all Indi­an lead­ers will be of low cal­i­bre & men of straw. They will have sweet tongues and sil­ly hearts. They will fight amongst them­selves for pow­er and India will be lost in polit­i­cal squab­bles.”

The state­ment above is attrib­uted to Churchill. I can­not find it, as a speech or in a book. Although it is wide­ly and increas­ing­ly quot­ed in the Indi­an press and, giv­en what is hap­pen­ing, he seems to have been prophet­ic! —K.P., India

I searched for this line, and iso­lat­ed key word com­bi­na­tions (ras­cals, etc.), with­out suc­cess.…

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“Churchill’s Unmerited Nobel Prize”

“Churchill’s Unmerited Nobel Prize”

A let­ter to The Guardian presents a new Churchill Trans­gres­sion. His 1953 Nobel Prize in Lit­er­a­ture (for “mas­tery of his­tor­i­cal and bio­graph­i­cal descrip­tion [and] ora­to­ry defend­ing exalt­ed human val­ues”) is unde­served! The writer says:

As his­to­ri­an David Reynolds has detailed, the six vol­umes of Churchill’s his­to­ry [sic; it was mem­oir not his­to­ry] of the Sec­ond World War were built upon selec­tive mem­o­ry forged out of ego, not least the “great man’s” fleet­ing mem­o­ry of the 1943 Ben­gal famine, in which more than 3.5 mil­lion peo­ple per­ished, to a large extent as a direct con­se­quence of Churchill’s poli­cies and actions.…

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