Tag: Stanley Baldwin

Old Victory’s Pride (Extended Review): “Churchill & Son” by Josh Ireland

Old Victory’s Pride (Extended Review): “Churchill & Son” by Josh Ireland

Churchill & Son by Josh Ire­land (New York: Dut­ton, 2021) 464 pages, $34, Kin­dle $14.99. First pub­lished in The Amer­i­can Spec­ta­tor, 7 April 2021. I was lim­it­ed to 1500 words, and so have added cer­tain reflec­tions that occurred since pub­li­ca­tion (“Just Among Our­selves”).   —RML

Josh Ireland’s “Life with Father”

Despite an inaus­pi­cious begin­ning, this is a thought­ful study of a father-son rela­tion­ship dur­ing the storms that rocked a trou­bled cen­tu­ry. Ran­dolph Churchill has now prompt­ed six books—not bad for most Churchills, short of his father (1150 and count­ing). Josh Ire­land here con­fronts his bit­ter­sweet Life with Father, adding fresh insights and thought­ful appraisals to our under­stand­ing of the great man and his offspring.…

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Munich Reflections: Peace for “a” Time & the Case for Resistance

Munich Reflections: Peace for “a” Time & the Case for Resistance

Jour­nal­ist Leo McKinstry’s Churchill and Attlee is a deft analy­sis of a polit­i­cal odd cou­ple who led Britain’s Sec­ond World War coali­tion gov­ern­ment. Now, eighty years since the death of Neville Cham­ber­lain, he has pub­lished an excel­lent appraisal in The Spec­ta­tor. Churchill’s pre­de­ces­sor as Prime Min­is­ter, Cham­ber­lain nego­ti­at­ed the 1938 Munich agree­ment. “Peace for our time,” he famous­ly referred to it.  In the end, he bought the world peace for a time.

Mr. McK­instry is right to regret that Cham­ber­lain has been rough­ly han­dled by his­to­ry. “The real­i­ty is that in the late 1930s Chamberlain’s approach was a ratio­nal one,” he writes.…

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Churchill’s Potent Political Nicknames: Adm. Row-Back to Wuthering Height

Churchill’s Potent Political Nicknames: Adm. Row-Back to Wuthering Height

Spo­rad­i­cal­ly, pun­dits com­pare Don­ald Trump with Win­ston Churchill. There’s even a book com­ing out on the sub­ject. I dep­re­cate all this by instinct and will avoid that book like the Coro­n­avirus. Sur­face sim­i­lar­i­ties may exist: both said or say main­ly what they thought or think, unfil­tered by polls (and some­times good advice). But Churchill’s lan­guage and thought were on a high­er plane. Still, when a friend said that Churchill nev­er stooped to deri­sive nick­names like Trump, I had to disagree.

Whether invent­ed by the Pres­i­dent or his scriptwrit­ers, some of Trump’s nick­names were very effec­tive.…

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