Tag: Harold Nicolson

“No Cutlet Uncooked”: Andrew Roberts’ Superb Churchill Biography

“No Cutlet Uncooked”: Andrew Roberts’ Superb Churchill Biography

Andrew Roberts, Churchill: Walk­ing with Des­tiny. New York, Viking, 2018, 1152 pages, $40, Ama­zon $25.47, Kin­dle $17.99. Also pub­lished by the Hills­dale Col­lege Churchill Project. For Hills­dale reviews of Churchill works since 2014, click here. For a list of and notes on books about Churchill from 1905 cur­rent­ly through 1995, vis­it Hillsdale’s anno­tat­ed bib­li­og­ra­phy.

“No Cutlet Uncooked”

He lies at Bladon in Eng­lish earth, “which in his finest hour he held invi­o­late.” He would enjoy the con­tro­ver­sy he still stirs today, in media he nev­er dreamed of. He would rev­el in the assaults of his detrac­tors, the ripostes of his defend­ers.…

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“A Sun that Never Sets”: Churchill’s Autobiography, “My Early Life”

“A Sun that Never Sets”: Churchill’s Autobiography, “My Early Life”

Win­ston S. Churchill, My Ear­ly Life: A Rov­ing Com­mis­sion. (Lon­don: Thorn­ton But­ter­worth, 1930; New York: Scrib­n­ers, 1930.) Numer­ous reprints and edi­tions since, includ­ing e-books. Excerpt­ed from the Hills­dale Col­lege Churchill Project. For the full arti­cle, click here.

Connoisseur’s Guide

My Ear­ly Life appeared a year before the last vol­ume of The World Cri­sis. The sub­ti­tle, “A Rov­ing Com­mis­sion,” is from the first chap­ter of Churchill’s Ian Hamilton’s March. It seems he took it from an ear­li­er nov­el by G.A. Hen­ty, one of his favorite authors. The titles changed places in the first Amer­i­can edi­tion.

A won­der­ful treat is in store in this most approach­able of Churchill’s books. Harold Nicol­son in his 1930 review likened My Ear­ly Life to “a beaker of cham­pagne.” His bub­bly expres­sion is not shy of the mark.…

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The Real Churchill’s London (Part 2)

The Real Churchill’s London (Part 2)

Lon­don: The Evening Stan­dard pub­lished an arti­cle on Churchill’s “favourite spots in the cap­i­tal” (16 June 2016). It offered only Pol Roger cham­pagne, the Nation­al Lib­er­al Club, Romeo y Juli­eta cig­ars, a Churchill bar, Pax­ton & Whitfield’s cheese shop, Austin Reed’s menswear and Brown’s Hotel. With the excep­tion of the Nation­al Lib­er­al Club this assort­ment would more apt­ly be enti­tled “Churchill’s house­hold staff’s favourite shop­ping places.” The real Churchill’s Lon­don, “Spin­ning Top of Mem­o­ries,” is that offi­cial biog­ra­ph­er Sir Mar­tin Gilbert. The text is online. There you may read “of Ungrand Places and Moments in Time.” These are spots which fig­ure cru­cial­ly in the Churchill sto­ry.…

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