Tag: Dresden bombing

Nashville (5). The Myth that Churchill Admired Hitler

Nashville (5). The Myth that Churchill Admired Hitler

Part 5 of Win­ston Churchill, Myth and Real­i­ty exam­ines mul­ti­ply­ing fables between the two World Wars. Churchill was an alco­holic, we are often assured. He flip-flopped over Bol­she­vism. All Jews were com­mu­nists, he said. He despised Gand­hi. A clos­et fas­cist, he sup­port­ed Mus­soli­ni. But one tall tale per­haps eclipses all the oth­ers. It is the idea that Churchill admired Hitler. Remarks to the Churchill Soci­ety of Ten­nessee, Nashville, 14 Octo­ber 2017. Con­tin­ued from Part 4

Judging Hitler Lord Rother­mere believed far more in Hitler than he was com­fort­able admit­ting, par­tic­u­lar­ly after 1940.…

Read More Read More

Myths about Churchill: Coming Up

Myths about Churchill: Coming Up

Win­ston Churchill: Urban Myths and Real­i­ty: Lies, Fables, Myths, Dis­tor­tions and Things that Go Bump in the Night.

Not a day pass­es when Sir Win­ston Churchill, who proved him­self indis­pens­able when free­dom need­ed him, is not accused of some­thing, from alco­holism to war crimes—often with­out seri­ous attri­bu­tion, or through selec­tive quotes, arranged and cropped so as to advance the pre­con­ceived notion.

On that elec­tron­ic Speak­ers’ Cor­ner we know as the Inter­net, Churchill bub­bles in a gur­gling, dig­i­tal soup, where he can say any­thing, or do any­thing, from hid­ing his fore­knowl­edge of Pearl Har­bor to fire­bomb­ing Dres­den.…

Read More Read More

WW2 Abridged: Too Easy to be Good

WW2 Abridged: Too Easy to be Good

Der Spiegel’s “The Man Who Saved Europe,” a nine-part web-post by Klaus Wiegrefe, odd­ly reminds me  of “The Com­plete Wrks of Wilm Shk­spr (Abridged),” in which three actors present the audi­ence with all of Shakespeare’s works in a cou­ple of hours.

There’s noth­ing par­tic­u­lar­ly nov­el or new in this series. Aside from the famil­iar attempts to cast Churchill as occa­sion­al­ly demo­ni­ac, it agrees that he “Saved Europe.” But one would do bet­ter read­ing about World War II on Wikipedia—or, if you have time, one of the good spe­cial­ty stud­ies, like Geof­frey Best’s Churchill and War—or, if you real­ly want to know what Churchill thought, his abridged war mem­oirs.…

Read More Read More