Tag: Wilderness Years

“Churchill and the Avoidable War”

“Churchill and the Avoidable War”

“If the Allies had resist­ed Hitler strong­ly in his ear­ly stages…he would have been forced to recoil, and a chance would have been giv­en to the sane ele­ments in Ger­man life.” — Win­ston S. Churchill, 1948:

World War II was the defin­ing event of our age—the cli­mac­tic clash between lib­er­ty and tyran­ny. It led to rev­o­lu­tions, the demise of empires, a pro­tract­ed Cold War, and reli­gious strife still not end­ed. Yet Churchill main­tained that it was all avoid­able.

This new book is pub­lished and avail­able as a Kin­dle Sin­gle or an illus­trat­ed paper­back via Ama­zon USA and Ama­zon UK. I would be most grate­ful if any­one who reads it would con­sid­er post­ing a short review on the Ama­zon pages above.…

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Mary Soames, Boston, 21 Nov. 2014

Mary Soames, Boston, 21 Nov. 2014

“A Cer­tain Splen­did Mem­o­ry…”  Din­ner of the New Eng­land Churchillians, Union Club, Boston, 21 Novem­ber 2014.

Yes­ter­day at West­min­ster Abbey, over a thou­sand of her friends and admir­ers joined in a memo­r­i­al to Lady Soames. A few weeks ago, in a spe­cial edi­tion of Finest Hour, fifty of them wrote about her. So it is time­ly to remem­ber her here in Boston, where she was with us so many times.

Tim­o­thy Robert Hardy led that issue because after all, a Shake­speare­an actor who dou­bled as her Papa is bound to know the right words, and he did.

He began with their meet­ing in 1981, with Chartwell a clut­tered film set as he played her father in the “Wilder­ness Years” TV series.…

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Robert Hardy: “The Wilderness Years”

Robert Hardy: “The Wilderness Years”

Boston, 1981— Well, it was a great show, folks. And, inas­much as any TV epic about Churchill is a plus, we wel­comed and enjoyed it. We are behold­en to WGBH in Boston, which most kind­ly men­tioned Finest Hour in the let­ter sent to any­one who inquired about Mar­tin Gilbert’s accom­pa­ny­ing Wilder­ness Years book, result­ing in fifty new mem­bers to date.

We may dis­miss Lord Boothby’s com­plaint (Finest Hour 36:3) that the Win­ston of this series is “a grumpy, vin­dic­tive old man [who] shouts all the way through.” Robert Hardy cap­tures what Mar­tin Gilbert’s books tell us was the Churchill of the Thir­ties: polit­i­cal­ly frus­trat­ed, less than effec­tive as a father, wor­ried over many omi­nous developments—and simul­ta­ne­ous­ly enjoy­ing one of his most pro­duc­tive decades as a writer and his­to­ri­an, not to men­tion his zenith as a brick­lay­er and con­tin­ued progress as an artist.…

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