Tag: The Gathering Storm

Robert Hardy’s “Wilderness Years”

Robert Hardy’s “Wilderness Years”

5 Octo­ber 2015: Turn­ing 90 this month and as viva­cious as ever, Tim­o­thy Robert Hardy spoke tonight on “My Life with Churchill” at a Hills­dale Col­lege Churchill sem­i­nar, attend­ed by over 500 reg­is­trants and 200 stu­dents, spon­sored by Hillsdale’s Cen­ter for Con­struc­tive Alter­na­tives. That after­noon I had the priv­i­lege to play Alis­tair Cooke, and intro­duce four excerpts from Tim’s inim­itable por­tray­al in the doc­u­men­tary, “Win­ston Churchill: The Wilder­ness Years.” Here is the intro­duc­tion to the first excerpt, which may be viewed on YouTube (first 12 min­utes). All four excerpts will be pub­lished lat­er by The Churchill Project for the Study of States­man­ship.…

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Politics Before Country, 1936-2011, Part 4

Politics Before Country, 1936-2011, Part 4

con­tin­ued from Part 3

Amer­i­ca and the oth­er great democ­ra­cies con­front no mighty super­pow­er, like Britain did in 1936. Yet we face  prob­lems which, long sim­mer­ing, may indeed result in a wreck­age sim­i­lar to what might have befall­en the world, had Churchill’s Britain, and its Com­mon­wealth, not stood alone against Hitler, until, as he put it, “those who hith­er­to had been half blind were half ready.” The clear­est dec­la­ra­tion of Churchill’s char­ac­ter and prin­ci­ple I have ever read came in July 1936, at the height of the rear­ma­ment debate, Churchill told Par­lia­ment:

I would endure with patience the roar of exul­ta­tion that would go up when I was proved wrong, because it would lift a load off my heart and off the hearts of many Mem­bers.…

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Consistency: Politics Before Country, 1936-2011, Part 3

Consistency: Politics Before Country, 1936-2011, Part 3

Consistency in Politics…

…was a theme of Churchill’s, and he often wrote about it. He made many mis­takes, but was sel­dom guilty of lack­ing con­sis­ten­cy. Con­tin­ued from Part 2

In 1937, Prime Min­is­ter Stan­ley Bald­win retired in favor of Neville Cham­ber­lain, with whom Churchill had served in an ear­li­er gov­ern­ment, and respect­ed despite their polit­i­cal dis­agree­ments in the past. But Churchill was soon dis­en­chant­ed with Chamberlain’s for­eign pol­i­cy, which remained as ded­i­cat­ed as Baldwin’s had been to appeasement—to not antag­o­niz­ing Ger­many.

Praising Chamberlain

Cham­ber­lain did begin to rearm the coun­try.…

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