Tag: Sarah Churchill

Mary Soames, Boston, 21 Nov. 2014

Mary Soames, Boston, 21 Nov. 2014

“A Cer­tain Splen­did Mem­o­ry…”  Din­ner of the New Eng­land Churchillians, Union Club, Boston, 21 Novem­ber 2014.

Yes­ter­day at West­min­ster Abbey, over a thou­sand of her friends and admir­ers joined in a memo­r­i­al to Lady Soames. A few weeks ago, in a spe­cial edi­tion of Finest Hour, fifty of them wrote about her. So it is time­ly to remem­ber her here in Boston, where she was with us so many times.

Tim­o­thy Robert Hardy led that issue because after all, a Shake­speare­an actor who dou­bled as her Papa is bound to know the right words, and he did.

He began with their meet­ing in 1981, with Chartwell a clut­tered film set as he played her father in the “Wilder­ness Years” TV series.…

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Mussolini’s Consolation (Churchill Quotes)

Mussolini’s Consolation (Churchill Quotes)

Is Wikipedia right that Churchill admired Ital­ian dic­ta­tor Ben­i­to Mus­soli­ni for hav­ing the “good sense to shoot his son-in-law”?

It’s a great crack, but it is not ver­i­fied.

Churchill had called Mus­soli­ni every name in his book: ”whipped jackal”…”organ grinder’s monkey”…”absurd imposter.” In 1944, after Mus­soli­ni exe­cut­ed his son-in-law, for­mer Ital­ian for­eign min­is­ter Count Galeaz­zo Ciano, Churchill said in a broad­cast:

 …the suc­cess­ful cam­paign in Sici­ly brought about the fall of Mus­soli­ni and the heart­felt repu­di­a­tion by the Ital­ian peo­ple of the Fas­cist creed. Mus­soli­ni indeed escaped, to eat the bread of afflic­tion at Hitler’s table, to shoot his son-in-law, and help the Ger­mans wreak vengeance upon the Ital­ian mass­es whom he had pro­fessed to love….…

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Churchill’s Life Today: December 7th Quotes

Churchill’s Life Today: December 7th Quotes

7 Decem­ber 1936 (House of Com­mons): “May I ask my Rt. Hon. Friend [Prime Min­is­ter Bald­win] whether he could give us an assur­ance that no irrev­o­ca­ble step… [Hon. Mem­bers: “No!”] …that no irrev­o­ca­ble step will be tak­en before the House has received a full state­ment, not only upon the per­son­al but upon the con­sti­tu­tion­al issues involved. May I ask him to bear in mind that these issues are not mere­ly per­son­al to the present occu­pant of the Throne, but that they affect the entire Con­sti­tu­tion.” [Hon. Mem­bers: “Speech,” and “Sit down!”]

Churchill lost care­ful­ly built polit­i­cal cap­i­tal by ris­ing to defend Edward VIII, who was fac­ing abdi­ca­tion over his insis­tence on mar­ry­ing Wal­lis Simp­son, a divorced Amer­i­can.…

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