Tag: Ronald Golding

Facsimile Churchill Holograph Letters

Facsimile Churchill Holograph Letters

“Signed Holograph Letter…

…by the British Prime Min­is­ter, on debossed House of Com­mons Notepa­per, thank­ing a well-wish­er for a kind mes­sage on his birth­day, 1947. Fold­ed once, slight­ly yel­lowed from age, oth­er­wise a fine copy. $1200.” (This was an actu­al offer on the Inter­net, but the hon­est sell­er, alert­ed by an observ­er, con­sci­en­tious­ly with­drew the item.)

More than one col­lec­tor has been tak­en in by these remark­able fac­sim­i­le holo­graph notes, pro­duced by Churchill’s Pri­vate Office from 1945 through at least 1959—some of them so con­vinc­ing that casu­al observers swear they are orig­i­nals.

Facsimile Reproductions

From 1945, at least nine vari­a­tions of repli­ca holo­graph notes were repro­duced by the thou­sands by to thank well-wish­ers, whose con­grat­u­la­tions poured in on his birth­day and oth­er occa­sions.…

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Thoughts on National Churchill Day 2017: TheQuestion.com

Thoughts on National Churchill Day 2017: TheQuestion.com

Q: The­Ques­tion tries to pro­vide our read­ers with the most reli­able knowl­edge from experts in var­i­ous fields. As we cel­e­brate Nation­al Churchill Day, April 9th, we would appre­ci­ate your thoughts on three ques­tions. These are cur­rent­ly post­ed with­out respons­es on our web­site: Was Win­ston Churchill real­ly that good an artist? What made him a great leader? What was his great­est achieve­ment?

 

TheQuestion: Churchill as Artist

​Please take a vir­tu­al tour of Hills­dale College’s recent exhi­bi­tion of Churchill paint­ings and arti­facts. Here your read­ers can decide for them­selves. The con­sen­sus among experts, how­ev­er, is that Churchill was a gift­ed ama­teur.…

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Churchill’s Common Touch (5)

Churchill’s Common Touch (5)

con­clud­ed from part 4…

Part 5: Loy­al­ty 

Churchill had “a rep­u­ta­tion for brusque­ness strength­ened by his han­dling of the com­mon folk,” his post­war body­guard Ronald Gold­ing con­tin­ued.

He had the habit of sum­ming peo­ple up after two sen­tences of con­ver­sa­tion. They were clas­si­fied, it seemed to me, as either “inter­est­ing” or “unin­ter­est­ing.” With the for­mer, con­ver­sa­tion ensued; with the lat­ter, Churchill would ignore them. On such occa­sions Mrs. Churchill fre­quent­ly came to the res­cue, engag­ing the luck­less in con­ver­sa­tion. If they were tongue-tied she would do most of the talk­ing until it was time for them to leave.…

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