Tag: Lord Alfred Douglas

The Real Churchill’s London (1)

The Real Churchill’s London (1)

Lon­don: The Evening Stan­dard intrigu­ing­ly offers an arti­cle on Churchill’s “favourite spots in the cap­i­tal.” In “The Lon­don Life of Win­ston Churchill” (16 June 2016), read­ers are invit­ed: “Browse the gallery above to find Churchill’s favourite Lon­don spots.”

The accom­pa­ny­ing gallery, alas, offers only a bot­tle of Pol Roger cham­pagne, the Nation­al Lib­er­al Club, a box of Romeo y Juli­eta cig­ars, a restau­rant with a Churchill bar, Pax­ton & Whitfield’s cheese shop, Austin Reed’s menswear, and Brown’s Hotel. (“I don’t stay in hotels, I stay in Brown’s,” they claim he said. The remark is not locat­ed in his pub­lished books, arti­cles, speech­es and doc­u­ments.)

With the excep­tion of the Nation­al Lib­er­al Club (see below), this assort­ment would more apt­ly be enti­tled “Churchill’s house­hold staff’s favourite shop­ping places.”

Hap­pi­ly, how­ev­er, the real Churchill’s Lon­don, “Spin­ning Top of Mem­o­ries,” was described in 1985 by his offi­cial biog­ra­ph­er, the late Sir Mar­tin Gilbert. The text is online, post­ed by The Churchill Cen­tre.…

Read More Read More

Churchills and Kennedys

Churchills and Kennedys

Writ­ten for The Churchillian, Spring 2015

When Lions Roar: The Churchills and the Kennedys, by Thomas Maier. New York: Crown Pub­lish­ers, 784 pages, $30, Kin­dle Edi­tion $11.99.

Pre­sen­ta­tion of Sir Win­ston Churchill’s hon­orary cit­i­zen­ship, the White House, 9 April 1963. L-R: Act­ing Sec­re­tary of State George Ball, Lady Orms­by-Gore, British Ambas­sador Sir David Orms­by-Gore, Win­ston Churchill (grand­son), Naval Aide Tazewell Shep­ard, Pres­i­dent Kennedy, Jacque­line Kennedy, Ran­dolph Churchill. Pho­to from Cecil Stoughton.

The most touch­ing and durable vision left by Mr. Maier comes toward the end of this long book: the famous White House cer­e­mo­ny in April 1963, as Pres­i­dent Kennedy presents Sir Win­ston Churchill (in absen­tia) with Hon­orary Amer­i­can Citizenship—while from an upstairs win­dow his stroke-silenced father, Joseph P.

Read More Read More