Tag: John Foster Dulles

Churchill on War (2)

Churchill on War (2)

con­tin­ued from part 1….

Part 2: What He Said in the Nuclear Age

Meet­ing Eisen­how­er at Bermu­da, Novem­ber 1953.

In the imme­di­ate after­math of the atom­ic bomb it was regard­ed by many as just anoth­er weapon of war. Churchill him­self spoke pri­vate­ly of using it, or threat­en­ing to use it, to roll back Sovi­et advances in Europe in 1946-47, though not on the ple­nary lev­el, and was push­ing for a nego­ti­at­ed set­tle­ment with Rus­sia by ear­ly 1948. At the 1953 Bermu­da con­fer­ence the British del­e­ga­tion was aston­ished to find Pres­i­dent Eisen­how­er, and his Sec­re­tary of State, John Fos­ter Dulles, still regard­ing the bomb as con­ven­tion­al.…

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Churchill’s Life Today: December 7th Quotes

Churchill’s Life Today: December 7th Quotes

7 Decem­ber 1936 (House of Com­mons): “May I ask my Rt. Hon. Friend [Prime Min­is­ter Bald­win] whether he could give us an assur­ance that no irrev­o­ca­ble step… [Hon. Mem­bers: “No!”] …that no irrev­o­ca­ble step will be tak­en before the House has received a full state­ment, not only upon the per­son­al but upon the con­sti­tu­tion­al issues involved. May I ask him to bear in mind that these issues are not mere­ly per­son­al to the present occu­pant of the Throne, but that they affect the entire Con­sti­tu­tion.” [Hon. Mem­bers: “Speech,” and “Sit down!”]

Churchill lost care­ful­ly built polit­i­cal cap­i­tal by ris­ing to defend Edward VIII, who was fac­ing abdi­ca­tion over his insis­tence on mar­ry­ing Wal­lis Simp­son, a divorced Amer­i­can.…

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“Churchill Defiant”: 2010 Churchill Book of the Year

“Churchill Defiant”: 2010 Churchill Book of the Year

“Where Oth­ers Heard Taps, Churchill Heard Reveille”

Churchill Defi­ant: Fight­ing On 1945-1955, by Bar­bara Leam­ing. Lon­don: Harp­er Press, 394 pages.

“Great cap­tains must take their chance with the rest. Cae­sar was assas­si­nat­ed by his dear­est friend. Han­ni­bal was cut off by poi­son. Fred­er­ick the Great lin­gered out years of lone­li­ness in body and soul. Napoleon rot­ted at St. Hele­na. Com­pared with these, Marl­bor­ough had a good and fair end to his life.” —Churchill, Marl­bor­ough: His Life and Times, 1936, vol. IV

On the sur­face, Bar­bara Leaming’s book on Churchill’s last ten years of active pol­i­tics is “pop­u­lar his­to­ry”: only 300 pages, para­phras­es instead of lengthy quotes, no con­ven­tion­al foot­notes (the back pages pro­vide line ref­er­ences).…

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