Tag: Great Contemporaries

Did Churchill Ever Admire Hitler? 2/3

Did Churchill Ever Admire Hitler? 2/3

Part 2: “Friend­ship with Ger­many” ,,,con­tin­ued from Part 1

Churchill’s crit­ics some­times quote sen­tences which they think came from his orig­i­nal Hitler arti­cle or Great Con­tem­po­raries, among which this is the most com­mon:

One may dis­like Hitler’s sys­tem and yet admire his patri­ot­ic achieve­ment. If our coun­try were defeat­ed, I hope we should find a cham­pi­on as indomitable to restore our courage and lead us back to our place among the nations.

In fact this pas­sage is from Churchill’s arti­cle in the Evening Stan­dard, 17 Sep­tem­ber 1937: “Friend­ship with Ger­many” (Cohen C548), sub­se­quent­ly reprint­ed in Churchill’s book of for­eign affairs essays, Step by Step (Lon­don: Thorn­ton But­ter­worth, 1939, Cohen A111).…

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Did Churchill Ever Admire Hitler? 1/3

Did Churchill Ever Admire Hitler? 1/3

Part 1: “Gov­ern­ment by Dic­ta­tors”

The Hitler chap­ter in Churchill’s book Great Con­tem­po­raries, like the rest of the vol­ume, was derived from a pre­vi­ous arti­cle. In this case the orig­i­nal was “The Truth about Hitler,” in The Strand Mag­a­zine of Novem­ber 1935 (Cohen C481). Ronald Cohen notes in his Bib­li­og­ra­phy that Strand edi­tor Reeves Shaw, who paid WSC £250 for the arti­cle, want­ed Churchill to make it “as out­spo­ken as you pos­si­bly can…absolutely frank in your judg­ment of [Hitler’s] meth­ods.” It was.

Two years lat­er, when Churchill was prepar­ing his Hitler essay for Great Con­tem­po­raries, he char­ac­ter­is­ti­cal­ly sub­mit­ted it to the For­eign Office, which asked that he tone it down.…

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When Churchill Read Mein Kampf

When Churchill Read Mein Kampf

When did Churchill read Mein Kampf?  The ques­tion came up in a Finest Hour quiz and the answer was: “In trans­lat­ed excerpts, and then in its entire­ty when E.J. Dugdale’s trans­la­tion into Eng­lish was pub­lished in 1933.”

Gor­don Craig’s “Churchill and Ger­many” in Robert Blake and Wm. Roger Louis, eds., Churchill: A Major New Assess­ment of His Life in Peace and War, states: “Churchill seems at one time to have read an ear­ly trans­la­tion of Mein Kampf; but he cer­tain­ly did not have more than a news­pa­per reader’s knowl­edge of the nature of Hitler’s par­ty or its cur­rent views on for­eign pol­i­cy.…

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