Tag: Chamberlain

“Marketing a War”: Ken Rendell’s WW2 Museum

“Marketing a War”: Ken Rendell’s WW2 Museum

World War II: Sav­ing the Real­i­ty, A Collector’s Vault, by Ken­neth W. Ren­dell. Whit­man Pub­lish­ing, hard­bound, slip-cased, 144 pages, pro­fuse­ly illus­trat­ed in col­or with 80 repli­cas, $49.95, $32.97 from Ama­zon.

Here is the most indis­pens­able guide ever cre­at­ed to the war that made us what we are today. From teenagers to vet­er­ans, read­ers will be enthralled with this portable ver­sion of Ken Rendell’s Muse­um of World War II: that inim­itable col­lec­tion of wartime mem­o­ra­bil­ia, doc­u­ments, per­son­al effects and auto­graphs housed in an unla­beled build­ing in sub­ur­ban Boston.

Vis­its to the Muse­um itself are nec­es­sar­i­ly restrict­ed.…

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Albert Finney in “The Gathering Storm”

Albert Finney in “The Gathering Storm”

“The Gath­er­ing Storm,” a film for tele­vi­sion pro­duced by BBC Films and HBO Inc.. Star­ring Albert Finney as Win­ston Churchill and Vanes­sa Red­grave as Clemen­tine. First aired April 2002, 90 min­utes.

Churchill films sel­dom engen­der una­nim­i­ty. But every­one who watched the pre­view, by kind invi­ta­tion of the British Con­sul in Boston, had the same reac­tion. “The Gath­er­ing Storm” is real­ly good. Even in a cyn­i­cal and anti-hero age, film­mak­ers still can avoid reduc­ing Churchill to a flawed bur­lesque or a god­like car­i­ca­ture. Except for huge gap in the sto­ry line, “The Gath­er­ing Storm” is out­stand­ing.…

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Robert Hardy: “The Wilderness Years”

Robert Hardy: “The Wilderness Years”

Robert Hardy in “The Wilder­ness Years”

Boston, 1981— Well, it was a great show, folks. And, inas­much as any TV epic about Churchill is a plus, we wel­comed and enjoyed it. We are behold­en to WGBH in Boston, which most kind­ly men­tioned Finest Hour in the let­ter sent to any­one who inquired about Mar­tin Gilbert’s accom­pa­ny­ing Wilder­ness Years book, result­ing in fifty new mem­bers to date.

We may dis­miss Lord Boothby’s com­plaint (Finest Hour 36:3) that the Win­ston of this series is “a grumpy, vin­dic­tive old man [who] shouts all the way through.” Robert Hardy cap­tures what Mar­tin Gilbert’s books tell us was the Churchill of the Thir­ties: polit­i­cal­ly frus­trat­ed, less than effec­tive as a father, wor­ried over many omi­nous developments—and simul­ta­ne­ous­ly enjoy­ing one of his most pro­duc­tive decades as a writer and his­to­ri­an, not to men­tion his zenith as a brick­lay­er and con­tin­ued progress as an artist.…

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