Tag: Battle of Omdurman

“A Sun that Never Sets”: Churchill’s Autobiography, “My Early Life”

“A Sun that Never Sets”: Churchill’s Autobiography, “My Early Life”

Win­ston S. Churchill, My Ear­ly Life: A Rov­ing Com­mis­sion. (Lon­don: Thorn­ton But­ter­worth, 1930; New York: Scrib­n­ers, 1930.) Numer­ous reprints and edi­tions since, includ­ing e-books. Excerpt­ed from the Hills­dale Col­lege Churchill Project. For the full arti­cle, click here.

Connoisseur’s Guide

My Ear­ly Life appeared a year before the last vol­ume of The World Cri­sis. The sub­ti­tle, “A Rov­ing Com­mis­sion,” is from the first chap­ter of Churchill’s Ian Hamilton’s March. It seems he took it from an ear­li­er nov­el by G.A. Hen­ty, one of his favorite authors. The titles changed places in the first Amer­i­can edi­tion.

A won­der­ful treat is in store in this most approach­able of Churchill’s books. Harold Nicol­son in his 1930 review likened My Ear­ly Life to “a beaker of cham­pagne.” His bub­bly expres­sion is not shy of the mark.…

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Galloper Jack Seely, Churchillian

Galloper Jack Seely, Churchillian

A col­league asks if it’s true that Churchill com­rade Jack Seely was “arrest­ed for arro­gance” in the Boer War! It doesn’t sound to either of us like an arrestable offense, but fits the character—a lord­ly aris­to­crat-adven­tur­er, and thus almost inevitable Friend of Win­ston. Churchill and Seely, cir­ca 1912.

A Churchill biog­ra­ph­er, Esme Wing­field-Strat­ford, agreed: “Gal­lant Jack Seely, from the Isle of Wight…a light-heart­ed gam­bler with death, was about the one man who could claim a record to com­pare with that of Win­ston him­self.”

C.N True­man thinks that Jack Seely could not have lived in the 21st cen­tu­ry.…

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Churchillnomics: The “Stricken Field”

Churchillnomics: The “Stricken Field”

A quar­ter-cen­tu­ry lat­er in his father’s old office as Chan­cel­lor of the Exche­quer, WSC was still wag­ing a for­lorn cam­paign for gov­ern­ment econ­o­my. (“Poy” in the Dai­ly Mail, 25 Jan­u­ary 1926.)

Young Win­ston Churchill’s sec­ond speech in Par­lia­ment was a bravu­ra per­for­mance tak­ing up his father’s theme for econ­o­my in the bud­get.

In Churchill in His Own Words (p 45) I date this quo­ta­tion 12 May 1901 and cite Churchill’s Mr. Brodrick’s Army, his 1903 vol­ume of speech­es (fac­sim­i­le edi­tion, Sacra­men­to: Churchilliana Com­pa­ny, 1977), 16:

Wise words, Sir, stand the test of time, and I am very glad the House has allowed me, after an inter­val of fif­teen years, to raise the tat­tered flag I found lying on a strick­en field.…

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