Tag: American Spectator

“Too Easy to Be Good”: The Churchill Marriage and Lady Castlerosse

“Too Easy to Be Good”: The Churchill Marriage and Lady Castlerosse

“The Churchill Mar­riage and Lady Castlerosse” was first pub­lished by The Amer­i­can Spec­ta­tor on 13 March 2018. It is repost­ed here by kind per­mis­sion.

“Here Firm, Though All Be Drifting” —WSC

It’s all over the Inter­net, so it must be true. Not only did Win­ston Churchill oppose women’s rights, gas tribes­men, starve Indi­ans, fire­bomb Dres­den, nurse anti-Semi­tism and wish to nuke Moscow. He even cheat­ed on his wife—in a four-year affair with Doris Delev­ingne, Vis­count­ess Castlerosse.

So declare the authors of “Sir John Colville, Churchillian Net­works, and the ‘Castlerosse Affair’”—unre­served­ly repeat­ed by British tele­vi­sion, mul­ti­ple media, even a uni­ver­si­ty: (“Win­ston Churchill’s affair revealed by for­got­ten tes­ti­mo­ny.”)

All these fables—every one demol­ished by seri­ous inquiry—are com­mon­place today.…

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Hollande’s Churchill Moment

Hollande’s Churchill Moment

Expand­ed from an arti­cle in The Amer­i­can Spec­ta­tor, 18 Novem­ber 2015.

The news from France is very bad and I grieve for the gal­lant French peo­ple who have fall­en into this ter­ri­ble mis­for­tune. Noth­ing will alter our feel­ings towards them or our faith that the genius of France will rise again.  —Win­ston S. Churchill, 4 June 1940

With every mur­der­ous threat to civ­i­liza­tion we are asked: “Where are our Churchills?” There isn’t one, and we should not expect one. Churchills are rare. They appear in extrem­is. The threat in 1940 was, if this is any con­so­la­tion, far more seri­ous than the threat today.…

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Near-Treasonous Dukes?

Near-Treasonous Dukes?

The Dukes of Wind­sor and West­min­ster are attacked for their “near-trea­so­nous activ­i­ty” and “overt sup­port of the Third Reich.” In an Amer­i­can Spec­ta­tor review of Sleep­ing with the Ene­my: Coco Chanel’s Secret War (Dec/Jan 2011-12) Roger Kaplan says Win­ston Churchill did not turn against those “top toffs”

The Duke of Wind­sor (1894-1972)

“Near-trea­so­nous” and “overt sup­port” are going some in describ­ing actions of the Dukes, and should be dis­count­ed. Rea­son: They may have been “toffs,” but they count­ed for lit­tle. Nev­er­the­less, Churchill did act to silence them.

The Two Dukes

The Duke Wind­sor cer­tain­ly had “much to be mod­est about.” Churchill got him out of Europe by appoint­ing him Gov­er­nor of the Bahamas, where he did not rehash his pre­war pro-Nazi points of view.…

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