Year: 2010

German Resistance: “Driven only by the restlessness of their conscience.”

German Resistance: “Driven only by the restlessness of their conscience.”

Churchill is quot­ed in a Ger­man par­lia­men­tary jour­nal as hav­ing writ­ten of the Ger­man resisters to Hitler: “These men fought with­out help from with­in or with­out, dri­ven only by the rest­less­ness of their con­science.  As long as they lived they were invis­i­ble and unrecog­nis­able to us… but in their death, the resis­tance became visible…their deeds and sac­ri­fices are the foun­da­tion of the recon­struc­tion.” [Hans-Adolf Jacob­sen, Ger­mans Against Hitler, 3rd ed., Berto-Ver­lag, Bonn, 1960; Bar­ry Sul­li­van, Thresh­olds of Peace, 1979].  But I can­not find the orig­i­nal doc­u­ment and some­what doubt its authen­tic­i­ty.  Can you  shed any light?  —N.B., Eng­land

I am work­ing on a les­son plan for a uni­ver­si­ty sem­i­nar at Munich Uni­ver­si­ty and heard in a film that WSC spoke in the Com­mons in 1946 of the deaths of Hans and Sophie Scholl of the Munich resis­tance group “Weiss Rose.” Does this remark exist and how can I find it?…

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Churchill’s Escape from the Boers, 1899

Churchill’s Escape from the Boers, 1899

Please can you com­ment on, the “Dutch­man, Bur­gen­er by name,” men­tioned by Churchill in his account of his escape from the Boers in his auto­bi­og­ra­phy, My Ear­ly Life? Is he one and the same per­son as the Charles Burn­ham men­tioned by Sir Mar­tin Gilbert in Churchill: A Life? Per­haps the sur­name was changed to pro­tect Mr Burnham`s posi­tion in South Africa, even though three decades had elapsed by the pub­li­ca­tion of My Ear­ly Life? It seems cer­tain that Churchill knew of Charles Burn­ham and the role that he had played: the lat­ter had writ­ten to him in 1908 (Vol.

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Provide for Your Library

Provide for Your Library

“BILL’S BOOKS”

“What shall I do with all my books?” Churchill asked in Thoughts and Adven­tures. It is a ques­tion we should all ponder—while there is still time.

In the Novem­ber 1st issue of Nation­al Review, Neal B. Free­man writes a touch­ing and sen­si­tive appre­ci­a­tion of the library of the late William F. Buck­ley, Jr.: an eclec­tic mix, from tomes on the harp­si­chord to biogra­phies of Elvis Pres­ley, from books inscribed to him to fever­ish­ly marked-up books relat­ing to Buckley’s own writ­ing, to the clas­sics he admired. Because he had not thought to leave spe­cif­ic instruc­tions, his library was bro­ken up, scat­tered to the winds—and not every­thing in it reached an appre­cia­tive own­er.…

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