Month: June 2009

Churchill and the Holocaust

Churchill and the Holocaust

In the Jan­u­ary 2009 issue of Com­men­tary, Hil­lel Halkin penned an inter­est­ing piece, “The Jew­ish State & Its Arabs,” which result­ed in a flur­ry of read­er com­ment on the Com­men­tary web­site.

One read­er had the impres­sion that Churchill “over­re­act­ed” to the 1944 assas­si­na­tion of Lord Moyne by mem­bers of the Jew­ish Lehi (Stern Gang). Anoth­er wrote some­thing I just could not let pass with­out rejoinder:

…had Churchill giv­en an order to bomb Auschwitz, rather than sim­ply rec­om­mend that it be bombed, it would have been bombed. He did not do so, pre­sum­ably, because he was loath to quar­rel with his gen­er­al staff and did not wish to stand accused of risk­ing British pilots and air crews in order to save Jew­ish lives that had no mil­i­tary value.…

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Quotations Winston Churchill Never Said: A Few Additions

Quotations Winston Churchill Never Said: A Few Additions

A web­site named “IL Con­ser­v­a­tive” post­ed in June 2009 eight Churchill “quo­ta­tions,” six of which he nev­er said. These quo­ta­tions are all over the Inter­net, none of them attrib­uted to WSC. They just seem to mul­ti­ply and get passed on, like the com­mon cold. They are all exam­ples of “Churchillian Drift” (or “Yogi Berra Drift,” if you are a base­ball fan): neat lit­tle say­ings attached to some­body famous to make them sound more interesting.

The pur­pose of my “Red Her­rings” appen­dix of eighty incor­rect quo­ta­tions in Churchill by Him­self is to coun­ter­act the raft of mis­in­for­ma­tion con­veyed, large­ly through the web, but it’s like the Dutch boy stick­ing his fin­ger in the dyke.…

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A New Edition of “Thoughts and Adventures”

A New Edition of “Thoughts and Adventures”

Thoughts and Adven­tures, by Win­ston S. Churchill, edit­ed with a new intro­duc­tion by James W. Muller. ISI Books, 380 pages, illus., soft­bound, $22.

If Churchill’s 1932 vol­ume of essays on pol­i­tics, car­toons, elec­tions, hob­bies and adven­tures dur­ing the Great War is real­ly an “undis­cov­ered clas­sic” (as the pub­lish­ers state on the back cov­er of this new edi­tion) it will be news to gen­er­a­tions of read­ers. Thoughts and Adven­tures (first pub­lished in Amer­i­ca at as Amid These Storms) has seen twelve or more edi­tions in Eng­lish; trans­la­tions into Dan­ish, French, Ger­man, Kore­an, Span­ish and Swedish; and even a com­bined edi­tion with Great Con­tem­po­raries.…

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